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SeaWorld Have Agreed To Stop Breeding Orcas

Remember that documentary Blackfish? The one about Seaworld’s killer whales, where it’s elaborately explained that about half of the orcas currently in Seaworld captivity have been reared on sperm from an emotionally and mentally scarred, non-cooperative, anomalous father who regularly attacked trainers about a decade ago? The same heritage line that has been directly responsible for the death of at least two trainers?

After a reported 84% loss in profits and a massive dent to their public image following the documentary’s release, Seaworld have promised that the last generation in captivity – those orcas still currently alive, which will continue to be used as showponies until their untimely deaths – will be the last.

While there’s not much to be gained in this context from bitterly hanging onto the past, the most obvious thought that comes to mind is how already too late it is to have decided this, not only in terms of closeness to the documentary, but just in general. As Blackfish states, it had been known by Seaworld that containment conditions spelled a whole lot of trouble for both the orcas and trainers, at the very least, since the late 80s. Some 30 years later, Seaworld has finally bent to public outcry, labeling these issues and damages to reputation as brand struggles.

The amusingly named seaworldcares.com lays out further changes, but they’re all just positive sounding buzzwords, so we arent’ going to bother linking them.

The seaworld facebook page confirmed the changes to their whole deal at 6pm WA time.