Features

Last Major Wild Population of WA Black Cockatoos Threatened Under Peel Region Plan

Words by: Smoko Henderson


Under the current Government’s Perth and Peel Green Growth Plan,  the last significant wild population of Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo is threatened to die out when Pinjar pine plantation is uprooted and destroyed.

This destruction of artificial pine forest would likely be the finishing blow to Western Australia’s native cockatoo, which has popped in and out of local and international public awareness for the last two decades as red-tail populations have declined to the status of threatened species.

This extinction threat was outlined in a report published in March this year by the Department of Parks and Wildlife.

This does inherently go against recent moves by the Coalition to pledge about 4 million dollars to threatened species survival, but of course, they waited to drop that cookie right before the election, and likely won’t touch upon it again until the next one.

Also worthy of criticism is the notion that destroying the pine plantation will cause any kind of immediate growth. Ellenbrook was supposed to be the centre of growth, so we dumped thousands of people out there, and now we can’t even be bothered to build a fucking train line. That’s some real good growth, right there.

The West Australian environmental defender’s office published a dissenting report against the plan earlier this year, stating that the Government have deliberately gone out of their way to circumvent West Australian environmental protection legislation.

Official rhetoric justifying the plantation removals cite natural water reservation by converting plantations to grassland, but this move has been widely criticised both in view of Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo and the established “conservation reserve” for Black Cockatoos which will be set up, but does not contain trees providing food for the species.

Much like environmental investigations surrounding Roe 8, it appears that a lack of investigation and a demented desire to get things done as fast as possible has lead to a complete shitheap of a growth plan.

Many have been quick to point out to community times reporters that the decision to raze pine plantations to save water does not actually compare to having, you know, actual good legislation that manages water.